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The Adventures of Deb, Tammy, and Shooting Star: An Equest Rider's Tale

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"It was 1am and Tammy was driving us home from fishing at the marina on highway 22 by Lake Whitney. Suddenly, she saw something moving on the side of the highway-she slowed way down and did a U-Turn. Pulling up slowly, we realized that it was a horse, loose on the side of the highway, just grazing! She put on her car blinkers and started to follow this little guy as he was wandering along the grassy sidewalk. Even though this is a 2-lane blacktop highway, it had no centerline dividers or side rails. The highway meets the grassy verge and then there are some fences and private property mixed in with business entrances.

At this point, I called 911 and told them our dilemma. Meanwhile, Tammy is driving very slowly abreast of the horse, attempting to keep him on the grassy verge and off the highway! We kept the emergency flashers on and lights flashing to warn all the other drivers to slow way down as there was something going on and we didn't want to spook the horse. Then, this yahoo in his pickup truck starts racing ahead of us, pulls in front of us and has to slam on his brakes, just missing the horse by inches. Of course, this spooked the horse and he moved from the side grassy verge and started to trot down the highway. Clippity-clop, clippity-clop. We heard the sound of his shoes, so we knew he had an owner and was somebody's pet or working horse and not a wild horse in the middle of the country.

Tammy continued to follow this horse, attempting to get him off the highway, and yet he continued trotting faster and faster and wandered over onto the oncoming side of the highway. Tammy followed him over to that opposite side of the highway, as there was no oncoming traffic at that time. After about a mile of harrowing, heart-stopping moments, Tammy was able to use her car to guide him down into the grassy verge area where he started grazing again. She pulled into a nearby entrance, and as we got out of the car, we both saw the same shooting star! Naturally, we named this horse "Shooting Star." He was a small, thin, brown horse with one white sock on his back left leg and a full white blaze down his face. We made a human/car blockade to keep him on the grassy area waiting for the police officer to shop up.

It was a very dark night, with only a small half-moon behind the clouds, and no streetlights at all. I was using my fishing flashlight on the highway to notify all the 18-wheelers and speeding cars to slow down and to become aware of Tammy on the side of the highway.

Tammy Shooting Star and Policeman

About 30 minutes later, this wonderful young highway deputy shows up. He told us that he was raised on a farm in that neighborhood, so we started to feel good that he knew how to handle this situation-he then proceeded to tell us he knew everything about cows and nothing about horses. Deputy Glenn calls for backup and his partner is supposedly on his way to help us and to bring us some rope to secure our "Shooting Star." After a while, we get notified that the other officer was now dealing with a DWI and could not assist the 3 of us. Then, "Shooting Star" starts wandering up towards the highway again.

We get our dog leashes out of the car and Tammy and the deputy slowly make their way towards the horse. They finally got close enough to touch him and talk to him in a calm fashion. Everything Tammy knows about horses, she learned from Equest-what a blessing that information was! Slowly, slowly, they were able to lay one of the leashes onto the neck of "Shooting Star", then loop it and make a lead rope out of it. "Shooting Star" was okay with this, and yet, when the deputy attempted to lead him, he became a stubborn mule and would not budge.

After much coaxing and tempting him with long green grass, Tammy and the deputy were able to get "Shooting Star" to an area where he could happily graze while we secured him to a fence-this was the fence of a boat repair company and I could tell that "Shooting Star" had never been this close to boats and boat engines before, yet he handled it very well.

Tammy and I continued to watch over "Shooting Star" for about 3 more hours while the deputy drove around the country-side, attempting to locate the owner or even a fenced-in pasture that we could get the horse into for the remainder of the night-no such luck! Finally around 6am, the owner was located and "Shooting Star" was able to go home safe and sound. The next day, Deputy Glenn called us and met up with Tammy to return our dog leashes. We always carry dog leashes in our car as we find so many stray dogs-perhaps we need to carry a lead rope and halter in our vehicle as well!

What a G-D wink it was that it was the early hours of the morning and not too much traffic along this country highway AND that Tammy noticed "Shooting Star" and we were able to get him to a safe area as well as prevent a possible disaster on the highway for both horse and human!"

-as told by Deb Lewin 

 

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Guest Saturday, 29 November 2014